Low-Contrast Text Is Not the Answer

In CSS, Uncategorized, User Experience (UX) by bchesleyLeave a Comment

Before using low-contrast colors on a website, especially for text, take a moment to remember all the reasons why they degrade usability. Then consider the reasons that prompted your site’s low-contrast design choices in the first place. Finally, look for alternatives that help you achieve those initial design goals without harming the user experience. Source: Low-Contrast Text Is Not the …

NoPSD | Technology Radar | ThoughtWorks

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NoPSD is a movement to integrate design activities into the iterative feedback cycles required to build great software. The name aims to dislodge the PSD as the final canonical design artifact rather than taking a dig at the Adobe software. Instead of signing off on a pixel-perfect design specification at the start of a project, teams are urged to embrace …

LukeW | Web Application Form Design

In Layout, User Experience (UX) by bchesleyLeave a Comment

Form Layouts When the time to complete a form needs to be minimized and the data being collected is mostly familiar to users (for instance, entering a name, address, and payment information in a check-out flow), a vertical alignment of labels and input fields is likely to work best. Each label and input field is grouped by vertical proximity and …

UI-Patterns.com

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User Interface Design patterns User Interface Design patterns are recurring solutions that solve common design problems. Design patterns are standard reference points for the experienced user interface designer. via UI-Patterns.com. Good idea and nice presentation of UI patterns.

Don Norman, the first user experience professional…

In History & Futures, User Experience (UX) by bchesleyLeave a Comment

1995: Don Norman, the first user experience professional An electrical engineer and cognitive scientist by trade, Don Norman joined Apple to help with the research and design of its upcoming line of human-centered products. He asked to be called “User Experience Architect,” marking the first use of the term in a job title. By this time Don Norman had also …